Sharing My Favorite Slam Poems

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Watching Slam Poetry has been one of my favorite past times as of late. Even when the emotions run high, they always calm me down and give me a new sense of inspiration, not only to write but to think about things that I otherwise would not have. Here are some of my personal favorites as of late.

Ressurection by Dylan Garity

In this poem, Dylan Garity talks about how there are many stories that go untold, and that some of those untold stories come from his own family, like his grandfather who worked in a factory and ended up losing a limb in unsafe conditions. It reminds me a lot of my own work in journalism, and how finding untold stories is always a top priority.

Grandpa Millenial by RJ Walker

What I love about this poem is how deceptively beautiful it is. It starts out on a humorous note, from the perspective of a Millenial grandparent in the future looking back on the past with their grandchild. However, over the course of the poem, it becomes about something more serious: Depression. “In those days, more soldiers killed themselves than died in combat.” It rings with a sad level of truth, the truth about our lack of mental health that is plaguing people without a way for them to get help.

Just Take a Shower by Jared Singer

I’ve never had a friend commit suicide, but Jared Singer’s performance shows that he certainly does. The way he expresses the pain of losing a friend comes across as absolutely genuine, and the idea of a shower representing the ability to move forward is a very interesting metaphor. This made me tear up the first time I saw it.

If I Was Your God by Dave McAlinden

This one comes across as a bit more random, but still brings some interesting wordplay and writing that stings together the ideas in the piece enough to be good. Definitely not the best one here, but still worth taking a look at. McAlinden seems like a fun poet, and I would willing to bet he has more like it.

Rigged Game by Dylan Garity

Another great piece by Garity, “Rigged Game” talks about how students in ELA courses often suffer because of the school not being able to teach those students in their native language. It also tackles this topic from the perspective of his teacher who is an ELA teacher. Something topical and important, which is a common theme in a lot of Garity’s work.

Did you guys like any of these? Should I share more in the future? Let me know in the comments below. Thanks for reading and bye for now, Friendos! Also, if you like what you’re reading and want to support The Aniwriter, consider donating on Patreon. Just one dollar a month would really help out.



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